Martin has quite a skeptical, very rational approach to those sorts of things,” “Immediately afterwards he was trying to work it out, really trying to pull it all apart. I could hear him discussing it in their little entourage. Amanda has a less cool minded approach, she was just enjoying it. It’s great because they’re very funny together, talking it through.

Derren Brown on Amanda and Martin (via drwatsonbagginsfreeman-nygaard)

mollydobby:

The Imitation Game ~ poster edit 

Full Size - poster edit here

Full Size - twitter composite here

source: (x) / (y)

gaydiationpoisoning:

You ever think you’re over something and then it’s like no, nope, still bitter. Going to live and die on this hill, this is my home now.

grxviity:

Eyes are distracting. You see too much. You don’t see enough.

stared at these for half an hour straight 

(Source: plaid-suits-and-paisley-ties)

The fact that you’re struggling doesn’t make you a burden. It doesn’t make you unloveable or undesirable or undeserving of care. It doesn’t make you too much or too sensitive or too needy. It makes you human. Everyone struggles. Everyone has a difficult time coping, and at times, we all fall apart. During these times, we aren’t always easy to be around — and that’s okay. No one is easy to be around one hundred percent of the time. Yes, you may sometimes be unpleasant or difficult. And yes, you may sometimes do or say things that make the people around you feel helpless or sad. But those things aren’t all of who you are and they certainly don’t discount your worth as a human being. The truth is that you can be struggling and still be loved. You can be difficult and still be cared for. You can be less than perfect, and still be deserving of compassion and kindness.

Daniell Koepke (via internal-acceptance-movement)

troublesinmytwenties:

YOOOOO OMG

(Source: validx2)

starkinglyhandsome:

dollygale:

captain-raptor:

best thing i learned working with and learning about kids: when they do shit like this, especially to something they themselves use and enjoy, leave it there for as long as possible. let them return to the fun thing over and over again so that it sinks in that the thing they did was wrong, they ruined something, and now they can’t have fun because of it and they should never do it again. it teaches them consequence of action and cautiousness.

i did this with a 3-year-old kid i babysat who filled his playstation with peanut butter before i got there, just every time he went back to it and asked why it’s not working, i opened it and pointed to the peanut butter stains and said “you did that” and he says “yeah”, “will it work like that?” “…no”, and when he got it and promised to never put anything but games into a game machine again, his parents bought another and he kept his promise. it works, even at that age.

this was a long and unnecessary rant but so many times i’ve seen parents IMMEDIATELY replace their kids’ toys/electronics that they destroy over and over again and i’m just like NO THEY’RE NOT LEARNING ANYTHING THAT WAY 

they also don’t learn from being thrown into fires

yeah but they’re quieter that way

(Source: ogtmoreno)

"It matters not what someone is born, but what they grow to be."

(Source: remusjohnslupin)

(Source: humorstop)

lion:

when someone reading in class and your name is in the story

image